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Thursday, April 3

Beyond America’s Original Sin




March 20, 2008
Op-Ed Columnist
Beyond America’s Original Sin
By ROGER COHEN




There are things you come to believe and things you carry in your blood. In my case, having spent part of my childhood in apartheid South Africa, I bear my measure of shame.
As a child, experience is wordless but no less powerful for that. How vast, how shimmering, was Muizenberg beach, near Cape Town, with all that glistening white skin spread across the golden sand!
The scrawny blacks were elsewhere, swimming off the rocks in a filthy harbor, and I watched from my grandfather’s house and I wondered.
Once, a black nanny took me out across the road to a parapet above a rail track beside that harbor. “You wouldn’t want me to drop you,” she said. ....
You may read the whole article at
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/20/opinion/20cohen.html?_r=2&hp&oref=slogin&oref=slogin





Do you observe any types of segregation or discrimination on any of the following lines? Race, ethnicity,religion,age,sexuality,disabilities...?
Please share personal experiences if you wish.

138 comments:

Girl_in_the_Front said...

First of i would like to say that segregation and discrimination is all over this world but discrimination tends to stad out the most, i observe discrimination everyday at my job but before we go into that i would like to share something that had happen to me. i was looking for a job in the add and i just happened to find one so i call the man up and asked him about the position, he said it was available and asked me about my background he said i " sounded perfect for the job"! he set me up an appointment so i can view the place and meet the employees, so i told him ok.... i arrived at the job 30 minuted early to make a good impression as i was walking in it was filled with white people which i didn't mind, but it was weird cause everyone was staring at me, so to make a long story short he said he made a mistake and they are no longer hiring,... now at my job when we take in application i don't look at race, or nothing, but when other mangers do they say no im not going to hire him cuz his 16 or she don't speak english or she's gay...etc.. so yes discrimination is every where...

Athena Smith said...

First of all I fully understand Obama’s statement, that in no other country would his story be possible. This is one country that discriminates less than others I have lived in or visited.
Trust me on that one.
However, "less" is not good enough.
There are two types of discrimination that stand out.
First we discriminate against schools in inner cities by linking their funding to property taxes and test results. I do not absolve the students or their families of the responsibility of studying and supervising respectively, no matter what kind of neighborhood you live in. I just add another dimension that perpetuates a vicious cycle. In an inner city school for example, the teacher spends most of his time disciplining and not teaching. If he had smaller classes, he would be far more effective. Smaller classes need additional funding. And so on.

Secondly we discriminate against the elderly. We tell jokes against the elderly right to their faces. We treat them as mentally incompetent. We humiliate them because of their physical “slowing down” while we don’t stop to think for a moment that the young may have the physical “speed” but lack in experience and wisdom. And worse, we segregate them. We refuse to even entertain the idea of living with them (if we are compatible). We don’t even visit or call at times. And being blinded by the vanity of youth, we do not stop to think that if we live long enough, one thing is for sure. We will all become senior citizens one day.

I met a white lawyer a few years back. He lived with his adopted black son in California, running a very successful practice. He told me he considered himself the personification of tolerance until he started doing business with the Indian community and observed that they never put their parents in nursing homes. He had never considered the idea of living even next door to his parents. After associating with the Indian community, he changed attitudes. He asked his parents to move in, and he has enjoyed every minute of that cohabitation. The perks were many. The mother actually started economizing on electricity, cooked real food, and provided the grandson with the ultimate experience: having the grandparents around.

fporzio said...

I believe that discrimination is a very real part of our society. I have seen people discriminated against for many different reasons, some of which have been weight, sexual orientation, and gender. At an old job of mine, one of the guys a I worked with was frequently made fun of for being “gay”; some of the guys I worked with made fun of the way he dressed, did his hair, and even the music he listened to. I have even met people that have made judgments on people based solely on how much they weigh, how they do their hair, and how they dress with comments like “oh, she’s a slut”, or “she’s just looking for attention”, or “guys that dress like that don’t like girls like that”. Whether or not people realize it, society discriminates on people all the time on a variety of issues.

Shaunda said...

I agree with ll of the comments an like Ms. Smith said less is not good enough when it the matter of discrimination. Women are discriminated against in daily occurences as well as work.
For instance iwork for an insurance agency where the manages an HR personnel highly lok down upon women becoming pregnant, asif i is some wort of plague in order to help them get out of work.

Not only do i work in an environment where women are looked as someone waiting toget pregnant in order to miss days and not work, but my job is also show a lot f racism. We speak to all types of ope throghout the daand sotimes when you ranfer a call over toa coworker and you tel them the callers name (while the caller is not connected to you both) if is a particular name the coworker will a same he person does not speak english, or that they are going to be a headache, or that they are going to lie the whole me. Sereotyping the caller before he/she even speaks to him/her.

Shaunda said...

i work at an insurance agency where we talk to different sort of people everyday, so i encounter racism and discrimination quite often. Sometimes wen i am transferring a call over people will say things about the caller basing it solely off of the person's name. For instance if his name is Jose Hernandez or Tsu Nyguyen they assume the person speaks little or no english at all. Its very disrepectful!

Ro-twin said...

I believe as long as earth is earth segregation and discrimnation will never die. I do not mean to be very self-centered at times but I have been in many situations were i would be discriminated against. First. I remember times at my job if someone that was white would ask me a question would get a second opinion because they probably felt i wasn't knowledgeable enough. Then find out i was right or would ask me something last when they knew i know the answer. I always got the assignments other individuals did not want. Besides, i see family members where i work would get certain individuals fired if they did not speak English at there standards. I also, remember when i worked at McDonald's and hired a couple of gay guys which were very hard worker got dismissed from the company because they were gay. However, i glad Martin Luther King Jr. did the things he did because i'm able to get an education my parents and previous generations did not get a chance to get. I do not care how people feel about me being black because God made me this way for a reason. Because nothing someone do to me will stop me from succeeding!

tampa250 said...

Believe it or not discrimination is going to be here until the end. As long as it has been taught, learn, and practice, society has to live with it or without it there's other important things to do and live for because discrimination has too many meanings to describe in this world. Race, disability, gender, nations, countries, gay, church, and etc. Who has time to wake up every day to know when they walk out there home they got to have all these things on their mine, I say be aware but dont dwell to much into it, It may start to have an affect on you and cause you to start thinking the same way. I'm glad to say this because I just started going to a new church thats has all races there, verses being at my old church with one race not saying thats bad but it gives me and my child to open up to other cultures and get the experience to except people for who they are.

SocialButterfly said...

I agree with tampa520. Discrimination will be here until the end. I even do it. It is always there. I say don't judge a book by its cover, but the other day I was in Tampa and I saw some kids cussing at people on the street, laughing at them and throwing things at the wall they were leaning on. My first thought was how stupid. I immediately snubbed my nose at them. They were very rude, that was obvious, but I instantly pictured their life and made judgements in my head about thier future. I did that in high school. I looked at other girls' clothes and thought if they were slutty or not. But one day the tables were turned on me. I was sitting in class and someone turned and asked me if i was a slept around. I immediately said "Do I look like the girl who would do that?" That person looked at my dark jeans, my large hoodie and lack of make-up. They said "no, but yesterday you were wearing a skirt. And did your hair." I quickly realized that they made the same presumptions that I made about other girls and that we were judging them by whether they were pretty or not. We had thought it was thier clothes but it was actually our own jealousy that lead our discrimniation. It is ridiculous how far discrimination goes but it is not unrealistic.

araya said...

Discrimination is a tricky topic. We discriminate against every person we encounter everyday. We take one look at a person and immediately pick them apart. We judge them by the clothes they wear, their race, how they talk, where they work, by how old we assume they are, and by their physical appearance. Unfortunately we do all this without even realizing it. These are all survival techniques we learn from any early age, we are sizing up our potential threats, or competition; all in a backwards sort of way. A lot of these things over time have developed stereotypes and negative connotations and they are really unfair and broad. Such as discriminating against someone because they do not speak "good English," even true Americans sometimes do not speak "good English." Discriminating against black people is a sad thing that is still going on. I have met some highly educated and very successful black people that are a lot smarter than most of my white friends. The color of your skin and the language you speak and the color of you hair does not have anything to do with your level of intelligence. I am a 25 year old white female (who looks 16 or 17) with blonde hair. I could not tell you how many blonde jokes I have heard in my life. I could not tell you how many times I have been treated like a child because someone thought I was 16, and upon finding out I am 25, their attitude totally changed. I get treated differently all the time simply for being female; sometimes for the better and sometimes not. Discrimination is something that every person has suffered from at least once in their life. It is an unfair challenge that needs recognition and we need a powerful leader and movement in society to help every person try to eliminate these stereotypes from the minds of the many ignorant people who still believe them.

Ashley Marie said...

Discrimination is a very hard topic because it happens all day every day and it could be the smallest thing that people now dont even think about or realize it as discrimination. Part of me wants to be hopeful and say that the civil rights movement was the start(which it was) of progress and one day everyone will be the same and equal everywhere. However, another part of me knows and fears that it will most likely never happen. Discrimination, race, religion, ethnicity are all too touchy of a subject for all people where all accross the world people will start all out wars just becuase of a misunderstood comment on the basis of any of these topics. There is not much people can do it is such a personal subject that people feel they need to defend themselves in which the cycle may never end.

dwtc said...

Segregation and discrimination are still very prevalant in society today. Every day it is all around us. The only difference between segregation and discrimination today and fifty years ago is the fact the fifty years ago it was more widely accepted and blatent. I think that today it is almsot just as prevalent, only on a more discreat level. So many times people of different ethnic backgrounds get refused service somewhere or when service is allowed they are watched with a much closer eye than a typical white. I also see much religious segregation and discrimation today. Christians and Jews and other religions are often viewed as outsiders against what I believe is a very dominant atheist society. I don't think segregation and discrimination will ever be solved due what I believe to be that humans are all naturally arrogant and selfish (to an extent).

tennispro said...

I do beleive that segregation is still a very big problem in todays society, even in our country. For istance, if the average person in our society sees a guy in a turban on the same airplane he is going to be very worried that he is a terroist and is going to take over the plane. Also the average person would see a black man or hispanic drive a very nice car, very rarely does he or she say he is a succeful buisness man, two things come to mind, he is an athlete or a drug dealer. I think segregation will always be a problem in our society.

J_Rambo said...

I have to agree with Araya. Discrimination is everywhere in all aspects. From what I see in the everyday life here in America, people are actually being taught how to judge every aspect of a person's life. They can take the simplest thing as the color/material of your shoes (or whatever) and turn it into an entire statement about who you are. Why? It seems that we've become so self-conscious that we feel the need to judge others to the extreme; usually in negative criticism. Just as the saying goes, "everyone's a comedian now days," it seems that everyone's a psychologist/mentor now days. Where is this line that people cross where they begin to be-little everything about others so they can feel good about themselves? Then you see people like Tyra telling men on national television how bad they are for judge women's looks; turn around and do a show that judges every little detail of women's looks! Discrimination is everywhere now, you can't avoid it. Some seems harmless while others cause great oppressions. Either way, it's always been there, growing, and now it's such a big part of our culture, we'll never get rid of it. We've fought racism to the point where "politically correct" awareness has brought upon a new racism. We're so afraid of being racist that we look at things in a racist view so as to know what not to do or say. I do have hope for the younger generations though.

brasilenamorena said...

I’m sure that many people have experienced discrimination from any angle, even from “minorities” to “majorities”. Although I have been lucky enough not to experience it to a great extent as many others have, being discriminated against still feels the same no matter who experiences it. Though the world especially the U.S. has come a very long way throughout these past years, discrimination still exists. Though one wants it to go away, it never will. Because people will only see and hear what they want to see and hear and to try to persuade them otherwise may not always work. So what do you do about it? Try to defy their stereotypical minds as best as you can. You cannot prove someone so wrong until you do what they thought you could never achieve.

wanttobefit said...

Segregation and discrimination is very common these days. If the person in front of you is driving slow, it's assumed to be an old person. If the person doesn't know how to drive, it's assumed to be a hispanic person, and if the person is driving to fast it's probably some punk teenager. Sad but true that no race is safe when it comes to segregation and discrimination even in the movies. If there is a drug using scene, odds are it a black group or if it's a car shop it's a hispanic group.

Mousie101 said...

Who says we no longer discriminate or segregate? It is true we do not do it as much as other countries, but who has the right to say we do not do it at all? People still think the same way they did 50 plus years ago. Times may have changed, but people’s attitudes do not. Please tell me I am not the only one who still sees rebel flags hanging from people’s yards? I was discriminated against just a few years ago. I just received my license and I wanted to visit my mom at work. She works for a preschool and I would walk around the rooms and say hello to all the kids and teachers. Well, one day I walked into a room and there was a parent there. I looked at her and said, “Hello.” This lady looked at me and then looked away and just started talking to the teacher. There was no smile nor a “Hello” of her own, just a look. Therefore, I was not discriminated against by race, but by age. That bothered me so much, because I did nothing to deserve that.

pink blossom said...

I also believe that discrimination is part of society. You see it,hear it, and feel it everywhere you go. I have a friend that works for an abortion clinic and as soon as she told the manager that she was pregnant, she said she'd have to leave eventually. Therefore, the manager told her that as soon as she start showing her belly, she was going to have to let her go. Only because of what people were going to think about an employee that's pregnant and working at an abortion clinic.

Also in my job, I work a walk in clinic in Tampa, and I see racism and discrimination all the time. They see a name and automatally think that person doesn't speaks english or even treat them with no respect because of the way they dress.

missmeliss said...

I don't see segregation as much as I see discrimination in our society. I know decades ago, segregation was wide-spread and that was a person’s way of life, but now I think our society has grown out of that illogical stage. Yet there will always be ignorant people out there who believe otherwise. From personal experience, I have been discriminated about my race. I'm Mexican. Whenever those words come out of my mouth, all I procure are glaring eyes and full-mouthed gasps from people because they can't believe it. "You don't look Mexican!" Like all of my replies to those comments, I respond with, "You tell me, what do Mexicans look like?" After acknowledging the tension they have provoked, they briefly try to change the subject, when all I can think about are those gasps and that remark. I mean is that supposed to be a compliment? That I don't look Mexican? How is that supposed to make me feel? It aggravates me to see how people could be so ignorant and subjective. Not only do I feel discriminated, but I feel confusion and animosity. People don't understand how one tiny little statement could amplify into one's mind for the rest of their life. So to answer your question, yes I observe discrimination in our society, and in my opinion I think it's unfortunately inevitable.

mdowd said...

discrimination happens all the time. one of the things that i find troubling is how often it is associated with humor, and how overlooked it can be when expressed that way. i'm sure we've all heard jokes that were really not funny because of the lines they crossed. stereotypes and prejudices exist because too few people take the time to think for themselves and figure out if they are acting on their own beliefs or simply regurgitating those of the people around them. Listen to what Obama says in his speech. I'm not here to tell anyone how to vote, but I do think everyone in the country should hear

this speech

it's not just race, either. by reading the posts that came before mine anyone can see that discrimination happens across all lines. hopefully there will be a day that it won't be this way.

Lucretia said...

This world is a sick place and is not going to ever get better. Obama is not going to change this country. Neither is Hilary, nor McCain. Just because he states the obvious, doesn’t mean he knows the answer. Yes, everyone in some way is discriminated against frequently. Yet, it’s impossible for everyone to get along and be ok with each other. In my mind, all this drama about being ‘segregated’ and ‘discriminated against’ is just something more for people to complain about and overwhelm themselves with. It’s not going to change; only the way you deal with it can change. I choose to ignore whatever discrimination I face, and move on with my life.
Once I was pulled over for having a head light out, it was mid evening. I had been to a club with my boyfriend the night before, and we were still in the same clothes we had worn. (Mine consisted of: black tube top, black skirt, fishnets, knee high boots and x’s on my hands; his: ripped jeans, black shirt, and hair that was longer than mine). I also had heavy makeup on and my hair was teased out. Naturally, I felt discriminated against when the cop said ‘Ma’am, may we search the vehicle?’ I didn’t have anything to hide, so I gave the ok. They had us get out of the car, patted us down, and called a canine unit out to inspect my car for drugs. Of course, they wasted their time, and after 45 minutes of waiting I finally asked, ‘So, is this because of the way we’re dressed or what?’ They didn’t give me a straight answer, only mentioned something about how they’re required to act on certain situations and people that ‘fit the profile’.
I’m sure if I had looked ‘nicer’ that night, that particular traffic stop would have gone different. But I choose to be a certain way and am prepared to face whoever has a problem with an apathetic attitude, and less sympathy.

“Great nations, built from the bones of the dead
With mud and straw, blood and sweat
You know your worth when your enemies
Praise your Architecture of Aggression…”

Athena Smith said...

Mdowd
THis is a speech that will stay in history.
I hope everyone in class takes the time to listen to it and reflect upon it.
However, do remember what he said. "In no other country would my story be possible."
Which proves to me that we have less discrimination and segregation than many other places I have known.

I also agree with Lucretia that we have to learn to ignore it. BTW, Lucretia... these lyrics! Always unique!

Athena Smith said...

The personal experiences that I have read from many of you, from "not looking Mexican" to having to quit a job in an abortion clinic becaue of pregnancy are unique.

Athena Smith said...

Dwtc
I don't think that it is atheism what you observe. It is the total separtion of church and state that may be confused as atheism. The vast majority of Americans are deeply religious.
If you want to see discrimination against believers you should read some of the Greek blogs I have been reading.
But as we said, discrimination and stereotypes are the way for people to turn a complicated picture into a simplified one.
So it fits better inside their small heads and brains.

JamesCowan said...

Ms. Smith, you may ask why i always post along religious guidelines, or rather, what has made me such a religious persons? my answer is simple, because that is how i have been defined by my closest friends for the past eleven years. People call me the jew without fail in my neighborhood, and they typically do so with a redneck accent more prevalent than usual. my nickname is a symbol of my tolerance for edgy comedy, my belief in the positivity of my religion, and my belief that the discrimination of the past has ended with our new generation. Alternatively, i fully understand that african americans dont agree with me, for example, despite my friends calling me the jew, they NEVER drop the N-bomb around our only black friend... and neither do i.

heather said...

I don’t think segregation and discrimination are as common as they once were however yes I have observed some situations in which they were present. I found segregation to be very common in high school amongst races. It never really posed any kind of threat or problem; people didn’t fight over it, that’s just the way it was. Throughout the course of multiple part-time jobs I’ve never noticed much segregation at all; however, discrimination is another story; mainly based on what kind of work ethic that person had. If it were, for example, a poor work ethic, that person’s race, gender, or intelligence would be the reason for it. Apart from the occasional teasing of stereotypes, I don’t particularly recall any situations where I myself felt discriminated against or segregated.

ofe22 said...

I agree that discrimination is all over the United States and that it is far worse in other countries but I'am not sure if it will ever end.I'am optimistic because I know that in our generation people have been more opened about being gay and I look at my friends and we are all from diffrent back grounds and we learn from each other.I think that learning about other cultures is important in order to understand them.I'am mexican and I also get the you dont look mexican comment too .It bothers me that there not thinking about how offensive it sounds.

Athena Smith said...

James
I share your optimism that the discrimination of the past is coming to an end through your generation.
But until the day I die, I'll be keeping an eye on you guys!
And just before I die, I hope to God I will be able to say "James Cowan was right!"

diana25 said...

As far as race goes I am not racist but some of the older members of my family seem to be some times by some of the things they say or they have said in the past whenever I was younger. I think some times I am discriminated against for my religion, age and sexuality. Also because I am only eight teen and I am seven months pregnant so a lot of people jump to conclusions about me like the only reason I got married was because I got pregnant. This is not a true fact. Or they figure because I am young I have already dropped out of college because I am pregnant and married but they are wrong I am still in college.

phildo888 said...

Of course I see segregation and discrimination. Who doesn't? It is all around us everywhere, and it come in a million different forms. Wealthy people have segregated themselves from the less fortunate. Races segregate and discriminate more than you could think imaginable. Jails and prisons have societies of blacks, white, and browns. It is how it work and it won't change. There will never be a time were all races and classes will get along in peace and harmony; just like there will never be world peace. It is just unrealistic. Look at America; we publicly segregate classes like upper, upper-middle, middle, and lower class. This is ridiculous but it is accepted because it is impossible to change.

APhilibert said...

I truly believe that everyone discriminates in one way or another. I was at a class for the military and the discussion of prejudice and discrimination came up. Being one of the few females in the class, I was outraged by the general opinion of the males: that it is not surprising that women who dress scantily are rape cases waiting to happen. I was furious. They argued that a girl who shows a lot of skin is looking for attention, generally sexual in nature. They agreed that rape was wrong, but slightly sympathized with a man who takes sex after he had been falsely led to believe that he was going to be getting it. I believe in the freedom of expression. I believe that people should be able to wear whatever they want without being judged. The conversation made me question my own opinions of others. Maybe a week after I got out of the class and returned home, I was walking down the street to the 7-11 at night. Coming towards me was a young male, probably in his twenties with a hoodie and baggy jeans on. I became very concerned with my personal safetly and began to prepare myself for a potential bad situation. The man walked by, paying no attention to me, and I went to the 7-11. I realized that I was no better than the males I had disagreed with a week earlier because I too was a host of judgement based on gender and age. I know that this isn't right, but I suppose that it is a method of survival and personal safety.

figlio della lupa said...

I think racism is something that we cannot really combat. I think it will always exist and no matter how hard we try to combat it, it will never fully fade away even though I think it can be improved. People will always use ethnicity or race as proof of superiority or lack of over a group of people.
In America, I see a lot of people complain about racism but judging from my travels, America is probably the most advanced nation as far as bringing down racial barriers goes. I remember one time while I lived in South America I dated an Italo-Danish girl. Her father told me in the dinner table that he is happy to see his daughter date a man of European blood and not a filthy half-breed mestizo. Now, taking into consideration that this family had been born in South America, that was a pretty extreme comment for me to take.
In some nations racism is seen as more natural and not as dangerous as here. For example, I remember going to church as a young boy in Italy and hearing the priest say "We must not mix our blood with that of Arabs or Africans because they have always been our enemies." Not including the fact that calling someone a racial slur was far more tolerable.
I was even exposed to racism at a very young age. My grandfather was a die hard fascist who fought in the second world war in North Africa alongside the Germans in the panzerkorps. Even though he shared a lot of things with me, I do not consider myself a racist as I am extremely curious on meeting people of all nations and having discussions with them and learning of them.
I have rambled a bit here but back to my original point. What I have been trying to say is that racism will possibly never die because it's so easy to use it that it just won't go down easily. It is inherited into many cultures around the world be it western or eastern cultures, it's just common and not even fought over.
Even though there is a lot of optimists out there regarding race in the future, some research shows a different attitude. A lot of people over the years claim that in the future all races will vanish and we will become one big massive race. However, a research case was published about a year ago claiming that in the future we can expect two races, one of tall "beautiful" people and one of smaller and uglier individuals.
The article follows for those interested:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/technology/technology.html?in_page_id=1965&in_article_id=489653

figlio della lupa said...

I also forgot to add, racism isn't always black and white. There is large amounts of racism between many groups of people that have similar skin tones. Some of the first examples that ring in my head are the Irish and the English,The Poles in Germany,The Japanese and the Chinese,etc.
I think sometimes people forget about this and it's important not to forget that anyone can be a racist.

Athena Smith said...

Figlio de la lupa
Thanks for the link. As you said, once you have lived outside the US you do realize the progress we have made in this country. When I travel to Europe these day I get a bit distressed by the new wave of racism that I see springing, even among the young.

Athena Smith said...

This is the first time that we get so many honest personal accounts.

Shirley said...

Besides the fact, that you see discrimination of all fashions in the workforce, and people label others just in general conversation, and many of people baed upon classification won't even talk to you if your not in their prestigious "qlicke."
However, when I was growing up in Detroit, during the early 1970's, I seen some of the worst segregation protests over children.
The segregation acts of busing students into different schools, to share different styles of education from black teachers and cultural differences from all ethnic children. Although, during this process many of parents (including my parents) where against transporting the neighborhood children up to five to seven miles away, when there was a school that our family members attended for years, furthermore, all my mothers siblings and my brother graduated from Frank Cody High School in Detroit, which was going to be filled with black children. The protests led to many days, even weeks that my parents kept us out of school. The schools were destroyed with racial slogans by the use of spray paint. School window where broken, trees and shrubs where torn from the ground.
As a young child, all this hostility seemed confusing. My parents argued all the time about unwanted types of people in their school districts, and being taught by a black woman, oh!
Needless to say, sometime in 1976 or 1977, we began riding a bus several miles away, blacks, mexicans, asians, ect.., began attending our school just down the street, while we rode the bus miles away. My first remarkable black teacher was named Mrs. Holloway. Still today, the school down the street has been repainted several times to cover racial slurs, windows are covered with wood or black rails to protect against breaking and entering, and the school grounds are no longer maintained. Thinking back, all I can ask is "WHY?" Today, my parents and other parents who onced protested with so much hatred, now live amongst, share the store, libraries, gyms, public transportation systems, walk downtown together and smile at each other.
Could it be that segregation is fear of the unknown cultures? Or the lack of desire to change? No matter what, in todays society, most must conform to societal changes and demands, others simply hide in their town.

countrygirl said...

Well, I agree with most of the comments thus far. Discrimination and racism play a big part in society. I work in a restaurant as a server and I see it everyday. My co-workers will complain about getting a party of black or hispanic people and say, "Well, they are going to be very annoying and they aren't going to tip." I do not think that it is right to make that prediction. There are some people in this world that do not tip well. It has nothing to do with that persons race. Maybe that month, they just didn't have a lot of extra money. Maybe they just did not like your attitude or the atmosphere. The point I am trying to make is that, you should not judge a book by its cover. Everyone is different in their own way even if they happen to look like another person. Nobody should pass judgement on an entire race of people, gender, or age. It is not fair, but unfortunately, it is the world we live in.

hrad said...
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hrad said...

I have had a few personal experiences having to deal with stereotyping. Sadly many people believe that some stereotypes are fact. I would like to see people interested in a race, ethnicity, and religion instead of cracking jokes because that’s what they see in the media. I have been told that I can’t be Jewish because I don’t have a big nose, and I am not cheap. I’ve been called a J.A.P (Jewish American Princess). Also, I have features that I’ve been told many times that I look Asian. I’ve had people order Chinese food off of me and have been asked if I can see okay since my eyes are very squinty.

mledoux said...

As a white male I can’t truly empathize the feeling of oppression of other “races” at all since I have never been in another “race’s” position; however, I personally have never passed judgment on another because they appear physically different than me. I believe that as long as someone has a heart and a brain present, that every one of those people has an equal existence and that anyone that feels otherwise is just ignorant. One of the greatest failures of society is the use of color when talking about issues. For instance, if a Mexican male states that Mexicans (or those of Mexican heritage) do not have equal rights, then I can say that man is just segregating himself by identifying himself and others as Mexicans. The same goes for any other race; DO NOT identify yourself as African, Chinese, European, Mexican, Indian, Cambodian or any other denomination as long as you are a citizen of the United States of America because …You are an American! Fortunately in the present, there is no school nor employer that can deny an individual (legally) because of race, religion, or creed. I think that people that use terms like “Black, white, yellow, brown” should be dismissed because until we all get past colors, stereotypes and segregation will live on. If people want “color” segregation to go away, then quite using colors to identify yourself (or community) because it is just segregating yourself (and community).

Jeremy Marshall said...

First of all discrimination does exist, but like with every other topic we discuss on this blog, people tend to over exaggerate. To say that we all see a black man in a nice car as a drug dealer or athelete is wrong, the majority of the people don't look at it like that at all. Sure some do but the majority dont. Obviously discrimination is always going to be around, but people always think of racial discrimination as mainly only whites who do that. I am personally sick of blaming the white man for every little racial issue, sometimes instead of pointing fingures we should take a look in the mirror. Discrimination goes two ways and it isnt just white people who do it.

Jeremy Marshall said...

If you want to talk about a stereotype how about this one," If your white, your life is perfect, you have no problems." Black people aren't the only people who struggle in this country, but they are the only ones asking for handouts.

msjessi said...

I believe that segregation and discrimination still exist everywhere all over the world, but I do agree that discrimination is more visible to me on a daily basis than segregation. Discrimination takes place all the time, even when people don't recognize it's even taking place. Of course I've been discriminated against because I was black. I've been followed around in stores, thought less of a woman, not given fair or just opportunities when it comes to job interviews or auditions, and I've even been pre-judged due to the color of my skin. Newsflash, brown is just the color of my skin and quite frankly I love it. I haven't done anything wrong or given reason for anyone to think I'm a bad person so people shouldn't be so shallow and ignorant. I remember I used to be down all the time when I was searching for a job...I thought I would never find one anywhere, but eventually I did because someone had faith in me that I would do a great job and I did and still do. Sometimes I feel like I should stick with the jobs I have because I fear it'll take another long time just to be hired at another one and I hate feeling like that. It's not only blacks that are discriminated against. Many people don't like to be around homosexuals because for some strange reason they feel that homosexuals just go for anyone and forget to realize that they are people and have taste too. Or, people think all pastors are bad and hypocritical just because one previous one may have failed them, and some even think that a Hispanic mother walking around with seven children is living the rough life, is miserable, and doesn't know what she's gotten herself into....but let me point something out, I bet she isn't asking anyone for a pamper to put on any of her child's behind. I know it's easy to make assumptions based on what one sees daily, but just because one person or a handful of people from the same group are acting the same doesn't mean everyone does. What people need to realize is that everyone is unique and that is never going to change.

Stevie-D said...

First, let me say that this article is decidedly democratic. In my opinion, when one truly understands what President Bush has had to do and the enormous weight of the decisions he has had to bear, that is the point at which I will accept their criticism of him. A presidency that uplifts is far less important to me than a population that is focused on the same.
But about racism: I have felt a kind of racism that is rarely identified. I am a 23 year old white male - just about as white as they come. Being in this position, I admit I have never felt the active persecution of my color, nor have I felt what it's like to be a part of a minority "race" or ethnicity.
However, with that said, I feel that by just the very nature of being white, I am expected to be prejudiced. Often, I feel that people of color, even my Latin colleagues, are watching and waiting for bigoted actions on my part.
And so, when I make an attempt to befriend one of these people, or do something friendly that I would do for anyone, I get the disgusted look that has, "is it because I'm black?" written all over it. True, I have many friends of other races and ethnicities that don't feel this way. However, generally speaking, minority strangers have treated me as if I have a superiority complex.
Such "reverse-racism" comes of being "born this way." I am "inherently" and "unavoidably" a white bigot, male chauvinist, arrogantly superior, and pridefully racist. I am expected to look down upon minorities.
Why? Because the worst news is the best news, and the worst of my "race" has been popularized by justifiably outraged "minorities." But if we seriously want to further defeat racism in our country, why perpetuate it by expecting it?

Athena Smith said...

Jeremy
Most welfare recipients are whites, not blacks. Which is logical if you estimate the number of whites arithmetically compared to that of blacks.

61% of the population receiving welfare, listed as "means-tested cash assistance" by the Census Bureau, is identified as white, while only 33% is identified as black.

You may verify this info in the article A white secret

shallowhal said...

There are many different types of segregation like age, for one instance how men at nightclubs try and get the young and more attractive women to come into the club and shake their stuff. Also race is still a factor in today’s world even though we would all like to believe that there aren’t any raciest people in the world there will always be that ignorant person who doesn’t want to listen and will only believe what they want to believe. Another discrimination that this world still has is towards ethnicity especially in the united states every day I here people making fun of other people with different ethnic backgrounds and once again it shows how hard headed that these people are and that they need to grow up and do something more productive with there lives. Lastly disabilities my mother works with mentally disabled people and she tells me the one thing that they want more that anything is to be treated just like everybody else and not be babied all the time, some of the kids have to be looked after do to there abilities and some you would never even know unless you went into their classroom and found out by the teacher.

mmariem25 said...

I have never noticed any discrimination or segregation against African Americans in my schools or in my work place. In high school a large part of our football team were very talented African Americans but it was not remarked on or recognized in any way by the coaches. Neither have I noticed segregation or discrimination for ethnicity, religion, age, sexuality or for disabilities. I really think that any residual caution or prejudice about those areas or about race are the vestiges of the prejudices of the generation of the 1960’s for whom those prejudices were very real. But that generation is now aged and passing away. People in my generation are generally more tolerant and believe in the philosophy of live and let live.
I believe Dr. King’s dream will be a reality when the old generation passes away. I do think that with this equality should come responsibility. I know that I am responsible for my own life, my education, how many material
possessions I will acquire and what success in my career I will achieve. At the same time I think it is time for all African Americans to take responsibility for their own lives and to quit requiring “special considerations” like affirmative action.

Chris said...

There are many different ways that segregation has come about in our word though out the centuries. Disability is a really big key issue in the United States. When people see someone that is mentally handicap, 85% of the time they try to avoid them or talk nasty about them. But truth is told, (we can learn more from someone that is mentally handicap then someone who is not). Age is a big part of segregation, for example how men 21 years or older are allowed in nightclubs to try to hit on girls that are 18 or older. This is what the club wants, 18-25 year old girls to come to a club and dress with barely any clothes and dance around like a stripper to attract older males to the club. Also, clubs also deal with race and this is still a terrifying factor in the world today. Even though we would all like to believe that with all the struggles and with the great words of Martin Luther King, and the great teachings there are, there is still hatred. Ethnicity is another big issue in the (United States today) People still make fun of others because of where they come from or how they talk; also people don’t understand that different back rounds have different ways of doing things. Sure, maybe things are being done incorrectly but most of the time different ways are the best ways to completing a task.

aw6349 said...

Discrimination is everywhere, in the work place, at school, within social classes etc. I know we can get rid of it conpletely but we can make it happen less often. I have eperienced discrimination at my high school I used to go to. I was actually discriminated against for being fat. They made me think that I had to lose weight when I only weighed 130 pounds. Discrimination is something I am pretty sure we deal with in our everyday lives. It can be bad sometimes but a lot of it doesn't get to the point of segregation. Discrimination does need to recide though because it has raised over the last years and I know we don't want it to keep raising.

WhiteChoc said...

I don’t just believe that racism and segregation exist I know they do! Growing up in a small town in NY I do not recall experiencing racism or segregation. The school population was mostly Caucasian with some African American and Mexican students. I never chose my friends based on race nor had family influences not to socialize with certain groups. As a high school student I began to date an African American and began to feel the effects of racism. I was fortunate that I only experienced strange looks and comments. However, now I am a mother of a bi-racial child and racism is everywhere. Unfortunately, most children begin to deal with racism when entering school. Such as what we have dealt with since my son began school in 1999. The location of the school does not eliminate the racism by the faculty and staff. He has also experienced it in after-school activates and sports programs. It is unfortunate but it will be a matter which we will have to continue to deal with. For those ignorant people who think that racism no longer exists they are wrong. It is not isolated to Mississippi or Alabama it exists Nationwide in the United States. The hate crimes that occur rarely get the news coverage and national attention that they should. For instance Jena 6 did not get national attention immediately, however 6 white girls beating on another white girl was local and national coverage immediately. We as a Nation need to stop sweeping our issues under the rug and deal with them!

juz10 said...

I feel that there is still alot of discrimination in America. For example, the belief in the white upper class is that blacks cause more crime which is blatantly untrue, they are just policed more than whites. People, ecspecially blacks but whites as well, from lower class neighborhoods do not commit more crimes than those from richer neighborhoods they are just victims of the higher police presence in their neighborhoods. There are just as much drugs in the suburbs as in the trailer parks and ghettos, yet people from these types of neighborhoods still flood our prison system. A shocking fact with displays this obvious double standard in our country is the fact that being caught with the same amount of cocaine carries a stiffer sentence if you are caught in a public housing neighborhood (a ghetto)as opposed to anywhere else. The senetence for a person caught in a public housing neighborhood with a gram of cocaine would be roughly the equivalent of a person caught in the suburbs with many times that amount.

roxanita said...

As a whole, this post is a sin. I’m not American, but since I have such pasty skin, many confuse me for Caucasian, until I begin to speak and my accent spills a little, so I personally do not have discrimination problems, however my mother has a strong accent and she has discrimination encounters. My mother, being Hispanic and a dark lady have troubles where they work with their manager while the whites do not. My father passed away almost 6 months exact, she called a meeting on the morning of the burry when my mother’s co-workers had plans on attending. She also had passed a card around for everyone to sign and collect some money for us, but it took her 4 and ½ months later to hand it to my mother saying she “missed placed it” and warns my mother if she is 3 minutes late because my younger sister has missed the bus and my mother has to take her to school, which my father used to do. On the contrary, a white woman had gone through the same situation, most likely attended the burry, handed a card of everyone’s condolences the very next day, and companied her the next few days after.

roxanita said...

i belive that what ever color or background you come from, when you get out of your comfort zone you will sooner or later feel discriminated because you are differnt, and it only takes one person to make many look at a group differently because its expected for something bad to happen,since it's hard to be good.

SilverDaytona66 said...

Yes, unfortunately I have seen many types of discrimination. As a student I have realized that every race and sex has been a victim of slavery sometime through history. I am very much against inequality, but I should not have to pay the price for what others have done in the past.
While doing my family tree I saw many of my ancestors were Slave owners, I'm not proud of that nor would I ever want to see that, but during those times that was American Culture. And yes that was the main reason the Civil War occurred, and many Whites fought for the freedom of all slaves.

Many people feel neighborhoods are segregated, but in reality most of these neighborhoods are places people want to live, no one has told anyone to live with your own race, but this is where they are comfortable, maybe it is just common interest or Culture. When people make that choice, yes your schools will have a different ratio then others.
As far as our schools that really hits a nerve. I am a very spiritual person, yet I don't feel that is a place for my Son to learn Religion, that's my job. Every time my Son goes to Music he is expected to sing a song that Martin Luther King sung while he marched, no one except for me has explained that the Civil Rights was really about, when I explained about slaves and the Civil War, he really started crying. I also explained the Civil Rights is also for Women and Children too. Once again the school did not tell him the whole truth. This I feel should be left up to the History Classes he will have to take in the future when he is old enough to understand, I don't believe he ever saw a difference in people until it was pointed out to him. I am raising him to Respect everyone. Our schools have got away from Reading Writing, and Math and tries to enforce Culture.

I just came across a incident at work that really bothered me. There was a young man, African American. He was working two jobs so he was tired all the time. My Boss's complaint was he was late and he would fall asleep in the break room during his break. This guy really wanted to be a Server and told me he had experience in the past. I started watching him as he was cleaning tables and he was interacting with the Guest and always had a smile, I was very impressed by his wonderful attitude. I really stuck my neck out and told the Boss how I felt and I wanted to be responsible for Training him for a Server. I did not back down I even brought up the idea if he was making good money at one job, maybe he won't be too tired with two. Well in this Restaurant we go from very very busy to very very slow. We are coming out of our season and hours are cut for everyone. This is when management looks at loyalty and dependability and if you had too many issues you will be the first to get your hours cut. Well this boy was cut to only one day on the schedule, so he did what anyone would do find a job where he is needed, So instead of coming in for his one shift he went job hunting, he was labeled as a No Call No Show and lost the job all together. Unfortunately he was not the only person to lose their job recently, many different people have because they could not show commitment. Well when I saw this boy for the last time he came up to me and waited until I finished taking an order at a table just to tell me Thank you for being there for him and trying to help him out. He never said anything about Prejudice or Discrimination. He just held his head high and left...
I really admire him for his wonderful personality. He really made an impression on me.
I am afraid today when we don't own up to our responsibilities it is easier to blame someone else for our misfortunes. I am afraid even if we were all the same they would still find something different about you to discriminate about. That is how Society is based, on differences.

Athena Smith said...

Silverdaytona66
Thank you for your account. I believe you are a new guest so I welcome you to the blog.

I keep reading very honest accounts from many of you. It has been quite a post!

Megan said...

I was raised in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints often known as Mormons. Everyone has misconceptions about this religion and often try to inform me of what I believe. I have even had people tell me I am not a Christian. Mormons are Christians. I have been judged so many times before people have taken eh chance to get to know me just because of my religious beliefs. Not many people take the time to understand the church but listen to what others have said and automatically trust what anyone says. I have been mocked before with people asking me how many wives my father had. Monogamy is not allowed in the church but because of the actions of a few in the past we are all judged. I know my religon because I was raised in it. There are many books and articles that have been printed that are created falsely to discredit the church. In the past our ancestors were murdered because of the misunderstanding. We were thrown out of towns and cities, even those built by our own hands because no one took the time to listen. After a while we were granted land in Utah and founded the first cities there where we were allowed to practice our religion freely. Not taking a minute of your day to try and understand had never made sense to me.

khester2 said...

I do see a lot of segregation and discrimination in many different areas. I most often see discrimination against women though. I always here people talking about crazy women drivers and blonde women eing dumb, as we discussed in class. I believe this is because many religions teach that women are nothing and we are below men. Also, I see it among religions. Many people often think that if a person believes different then they do, that the person is worth less than them and should not come into contact with them. We also stereotype certain groups of people with very little knowledge of how they truly are. I think discrimination and segregation is a huge problem in America.

richwhitegirl said...

Lucky for me I have grown up allot of my life around people who would never bring up race as an issue when it comes to a person they encounter, there sexual orientation though is a bit of different story. I was raised in a Pentecostal church where they would preach that homosexuals are sinners and in turn are going to hell, which never really made sense to me even as a child. Could this man that they say has no hatred in his heart really want a certain type of person to be condemed just because of who they are.Even in high school I remember kids teasing other kids because of their sexual orientation. It just never made sense to me why you would hate someone for that.

Stevie-D said...

megan-
Ditto to what you said. That is definitely true. I would know because I'm Mormon too! :)
Do you still attend?

phillyfan said...

I have been discriminated against multiple times when i try and play a pick up game of basketball because i am white and they assume because i am white that i can not play. After the game they say to me that they wished they had picked me up. My manager has hired men and women from different backrounds and ethnicity so at my job there seems to be no segragation or discrimination. At my highschool, back in the day, there was a lot of seperation of different races. The white kids sat together, hispanics sat with one another and black kids sat with other black kids. Overall i have never really seen bad discrimination in my life time but i can believe it was really bad back during the civil war days. People have grown up for the most part over the last century when it comes to different races. Im sure there is segregation out there that im just not seeing but i think for the most part it has gone away. I think if Dr. King was still alive he would be pleased to see that men and women of all races have become friends.

Pamber said...

Discrimination explained within this article. The writer explains that, “on return visits, I wandered into blacks-only public toilet or sat on a blacks-only bench.
Blacks only — and I was white.” In this part of Africa there is still separation & discrimination among race. I believe within the U.S. discriminating against sex is more predominate. I experience discrimination hands on in the work place. I as a female make less than males within my same position. A male was recently hired and his starting pay surpassing mine when I’ve work their 4 years longer and posses more experience over all with in the field. Unfortunately we live in a discriminative and racist world with hopeful over time will improve.

tabi said...

i believe there is racism everywhere, it is just the matter of fact if anyone acts on it.In this blog post one line caught my attention, where the men said they wouldnt dare desire a black woman.They talk as if this "black" woman had a desease, this just shows how ignorant peopple can get without the proper education and morals.one example i can bring to this blog is when me and my friends who are also minorities hang out all together, i see that whites or other people who are walking by seem to be intimidated by us and walk far away from us specialy if men were in the group, i find it funny becuase they have no reason to be scared or nonetheless intimidated by us.If i could i wish i could stop all racism, all it is is hate and/or jealousy, or the need to have power so they descriminate against people who they "think" are below them. Racism, descrimination and anything related to it makes me angry,i wish it would just stop because it is meaningless.

bb521 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
bb521 said...

I have heard derogatory comments toward all of the following race, religion, sexuality, and disabilities. I think most of those comments are just joking but there difenitly some people that really hate certain kind of people. The most prevalant is discrimanation against gay people. I myself have no promblem with gays, I have a gay friend and a firmly believe that they dont choose to be gay, what they go through would not be worth being gay. If he want to see discrimnation follow around a gay person in highschool. There is a bigger picture to discrimination found all over the world. In America it was discrimination against blacks, now it is muslims. It is not just america though it is all over the world people find reasons to hate another race or ethinicity usually for political reasons.

Jeremy Marshall said...

I didnt say anything about wellfare. They want everything to be spoonfed to them, not all of them but the majority do. Im not saying i agree with slavery, but just because they were slaves a hundred and something years ago doesnt mean they deserve special treatment. African-Amercians weren't the only people who were slaves, and to blame that strictly on white people is wrong. The first people to enslave africans, were their own people, not white people. African-Americans aren't the only people who are discriminated upon, unlike Asians, or Latin-Americans, they choose not to rise above it, they choose to just stay where they are and point fingers. They can blame their problems on every one else all they want but, to blame it, like slavery, on white people is wrong. They choose to segregate themselves, not the other way around, and there are just as many racist blacks as there are whites, it goes both ways.

Athena Smith said...

Indeed slavery is an ancient phenomenon, and individual responsibility does play an important role in one’s growth. But I strongly disagree with the statement “they choose not to rise above it, they choose to just stay where they are and point fingers.” And I disagree for two reasons:
First, pointing fingers is not a black phenomenon but a universal one. True for Whites, Blacks, Hispanics. I have traveled extensively, I have lived in various countries, I have seen it in Greece, in Belgium, in the UK, in Bermuda, I have seen it in kids and adults alike, in you and me. If you travel to Europe these days, you will see the majority of Europeans who simply have fallen behind because of thirty year old socialist policies point the finger at their immigrant populations. No, they don’t blame themselves for adopting unsustainable social policies, 35 hour weeks and 5 or 6 week vacations, or pensions for women with kids only after 15 years of work. It’s always someone else.

Secondly, to claim that one chooses to stay behind may be true for a few people who are not resilient but the picture of poverty I am afraid is terribly complicated and goes way beyond the small number of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics who have behaved in an outrageously irresponsible way in their personal lives and choices. And here is why I believe the picture is terribly complicated. The answer is rather lengthy I am afraid so bear with me.

A while ago I showed the results of a research project conducted in the US, Mexico, Canada, various European countries regarding the residents’ attitudes towards the causes of poverty. The question was: Is poverty the result of personal laziness or societal injustice? The Americans chose overwhelmingly the former, the Canadians, Mexicans and the Europeans the latter. I was struck by the absence of middle ground in the answer options (like “both”) and I posed the same question to all my students in all my courses, 170 of you. It is “both” the majority of you guys said. And I know that most of you knew what you were talking about because many of you have been there. As a matter of fact I have never seen so much resilience and effort in my life than among the community college student. The personal stories that I came to hear from some of you have inspired me with awe and deep respect for the obstacles you had to overcome and you still face. Despite two full time loads you show up and you discipline yourself. Black, brown or white. Men and women. Hats off therefore.

So let’s become specific. First the statistics show a rise in income among all racial or ethnic groups. Take a look here.

One sees the increase in median income for three groups, the whites, the blacks and the Hispanics. Calculate the percentage of increase in the median income from 1975 to 2006.
The median income for whites increased by 28,4%
For blacks by 34,5%
For Hispanics by 25%

The gap in poverty rates has narrowed since 1975, but remains substantial. The white household median income is close to 55% higher than the Black and 33% higher than the Hispanic. You may concentrate on the gap. Or you may concentrate on the rate of improvement which has been sharper for Blacks.
At the same time white adults are also more likely than black and Hispanic adults to have college degrees and to own a house.

Ownership of a house. That’s a very important factor in determining possibilities of growth. Rates of house ownership rose among white middle-class families after World War II because the whites were the only ones back then to have access to credit and government programs. These programs back then did not cover blacks. Lance Freeman, assistant professor of urban planning at Columbia University and author of "There Goes the 'Hood" concluded that the effects of the housing discrimination policies back then are still being felt today.

Why? Because house ownership creates wealth, and that wealth facilitates residence in good neighborhoods where they have good schools. House ownership also helps finance college attendance that leads to better-paying jobs, Freeman said. Similarly, Thomas Shapiro, professor of law and social policy at Brandeis University, agreed that home ownership could narrow racial gaps because it would help minority families accumulate wealth.

76% of white households owned their homes in 2005, 46% of black and 48% of Hispanic.

Outsourcing of manufacturing jobs has also hurt the blacks more than whites, and it was these manufacturing jobs after WWII that helped many whites escape poverty according to Hilary Shelton, director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's Washington office.


From the 2005 Census Bureau racial data on incomes, education levels, home ownership rates and poverty rates I copy that black adults have narrowed the gap with white adults in earning high school diplomas, but the gap has widened for college degrees. 37% percent of white adults had at least a bachelor's degree in 2005, while the number for blacks was 17%, for Hispanics 12% and for Asians 49%.
Now keep in mind that the most significant determinant of college attendance is family income.
Of course part of the picture can be explained by personal laziness. But only a part. Social structures of the past created more opportunities for some, fewer for others. No group of people can be blamed for “choosing” to stay behind. No group is that suicidal. Some individuals –and they belong to all groups- do. That is a fact, as we have seen so many (regardless of color or ethnicity) flanking out and so many excelling, despite the obstacles.

kmabe said...

First let me say that the whole "Original Sin" thing in my opinion is way off and becoming a bore. Yes discrimination happens EVERYWHERE over all sorts of issues. I am guilty of no sin when it comes to slavery. I am so tired of it being thrown in the face of Americans today how we are so guilty of slavery. Thats bull. Yes it happened yes there were some generations who were guilty of it but I had nothing to do with it nor did my parent or grandparents. It was horribly wrong that it ever happened. I hate it, men women and children's lives ripped apart or killed being forced to serve another. God created all men equal. But I am not responsible for the choices or actions of those who lived in the past, I can learn from anothers mistake but I can't stop what came before me. Oh and I always love how over looked it is how comparatively England's number of slaves (who brought them in the first place as I recall) was so much greater.

Anyways but as to the article its self and discrimination I would have to say that most of my experience with it has been through religion. People who are morally against certain things such homosexuality for instance are now marked more often as hating or being discriminative for their beliefs. For me may behavior and beliefs are due to my Christianity and the desire to live as the Bible says. I have on many occasions been dissed or shunned because oh I think its wrong to get drunk, or do drugs, or curse. Or because I don't agree with premarital sex or again homosexuality. People push so hard for acceptance with some things and yes many important ones but it has come to the point in my opinion that it has now become an excuse for those who want to get away with whatever they want.

Again when it comes to things like peoples life choice I may not agree with it but I won't tell another how to live their life; it is their choice. However my point is simply by not bending my beliefs and acceptance of immoral (to me) actions to the masses, I myself become discriminated against. I see it everywhere and have experienced this type of treatment for years. I understand what it feels like to be treated like that so I en devour not to treat others in a like manner. As much as we strive to have peace and good will toward one another I don't personally believe it will ever could ever happen on mans effort alone, we are to flawed and selfish, and it saddens me greatly.

Athena Smith said...

And since the discussion has included levels of individual responibility, remember to register and vote in the upcoming elections.
You may download the form here and you can always vote by mail.

JC_Lims said...

The definition of Segregation is the policy or practice of compelling racial groups to live apart from each other like go to separate schools, use separate social facilites, etc. The term of Discrimination is the act of discriminating, or distinguishing differences according to Webster's New World Dictionary. I would say there is a connection between both of that act. When people segregate, it would be possible for them to discriminate others. Based on my personal observation, I do see a lot of discrimination in here and of course other countries. Eventhough I did not grow up in here, but sometimes I can see clear enough how people is treated differently based on their race, background and any other things. It is obvious to in my homecountry when the poor people are treated badly than others who have power.For me, it is heartbreaking if we just make a bad judgement to others without looking that we are just human with our strength and weakness. We are created differently from physical and mental orietation, and we are live from various societies.Because of that can we just think and realize with our dissimilarity we need to stand side by side to build the better future without war and poverty.\

I all agree with Mrs. Smith comment about how we reject our elderly in here. In my family, we must respect to older people. It is not right to bring our parents in nursing home. I guess it is part of our culture, but in here a lot of young generation does not respect with the eldery. From that, I realize that we are disparate but wouldn't be nice to make this difference into a unity in a good way.

jmcdonald10 said...

I think discrimination is something that is in everyone’s life and will never go away. I also think that people see acts of discrimination everyday and they don’t do anything about it. One type of discrimination that I think is very bad in my daily life is people who are form different background. When people speak with a different accent, I don’t think that people take it that very well. For example, at my work place, a co work was placing an order and she was on the phone with a foreign person and because she could not understand them, she hot bad and started yelling at them. I don’t think that this is right and I feel bad for people who are just trying to live their lifes and people don’t understand why they have to be different.

B1ackMesa said...

Honestly, on a daily basis, I don't really observe any types of discrimination. At all. But that doesn't mean I never see it, or that I don't think it is there. I have seen it before in places like high school. In high school, most of the kids are part of groups that a lot of the time don't mix. It's sad, but unfortunately true.

I thin that there will always be someone who will discriminate. I believe it starts with the parents. If a child sees that their parents don't like a specific thing, chances are they won't either. If a parent doesn't teach their child to treat everyone with respect and equality, it is partly the parent's fault, how the child end's up.

lidget33 said...

Discrimination is around still, I don’t necessarily see it everyday. I work with an older woman in her 70s and I have heard a few comments about her. Not necessarily that she can’t work because she is older but she does do what she wants and has never been in trouble. That doesn’t bother me, even if it is ageism, because working at 72 has to be difficult. At school I can’t say I see it too much, definitely in high school but not at the HCC campus. In high school it is bad, gay, black, Hispanic, white it didn’t matter who you were someone had something nasty to say before they even looked twice at you. .I am lucky with who my parents are because I have never heard them say anything hateful against people because of race, sexuality. So I definitely think it is something that people can move away from but it will take a lot of work from everybody.

Athena Smith said...

As for ageism, I drew my conclusions from what I watched happening in retirement commnities.
However,I have watched something different at Fort Myers where I am right now. I saw quite a few teens walking on the pier and on the beach with their grandparents. And they did not look bored.
Maybe your generation will put things right.
Maybe.

Jeremy Marshall said...

Regarding the percent of races who are more likely to earn a college degree, yes whites are more likely, which doesnt make sense. There are numerous more opportunities for minorities not just blacks to go to college. There are more scholarships and funds dedicated towards minorities than whites. The opportunities are there and they are plentiful, but why arent they taking them?

kel1ove said...

Segregation and descrimination have always seemed to be around and probably will always be around. It is a very cultural thing.. everyone experiences some sort of racism, prejudice, comments about your age status or religion, etc. It is not dominant on a certain side either. White people get called names, black people too, hispanics, christians, jews, older generations, etc. People always complain about it too like it is the biggest insult ever, but EVERYone does it whether out loud or to themselves. We judge people we do not know and we judge people we do know. It's one of those things in life that just happen.
I've heard that "black people tip pretty crappy sometimes.."
I've heard people called "beaners or strawberry pickers"(even if just jokingly)
So on, everyone knows what people say.
In a way it makes us stronger people because we walk out the door knowing that SOMEone you pass by today will think SOMEthing about you...and we have to learn to just not care what they think and be happy with who we are and embrace it. This is basically how it goes..

sunflower said...

I agree that the segregation and discrimination is all over the world. I also agree that the United States is a country that discriminates less than others. I came to America a few years ago. At that time, I cannot talk with others in English. However, I found that Americans are very nice and friendly. I adjusted the culture shock quickly. The situation was much better than I imaged. Comparing to other countries I visited, I think America is a country that foreigners can feel comfortable when they first step in. Another example is American colleges always open their door to old people, but in many countries, old people is rejected outside the college campus.

Dawid said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dawid said...

I personally see segregation everyday just by class or by an individuals certain status according to another. And I truely believe that its unfair that people are treated by martial status theses days. because the rich get treated as if their superior or Gods of some sort and are pampered and the poor are treated like scum or inferior opposed to the rich so called superior. And whats sad that its been pressed on peoples conscious as though yes this is right and how it is and to me thats unacceptable everyone should be treated fairly even down to every homeless person on every corner. As far as discrimination I see it everyday but not as strong because people try to hide but its still alive people discriminate oftenly and dont even realize by gesters made to people of a certain race, ethnicity,sex,religion,genre,age,sexuality,disabilities,and etc., Its everywhere.

Celina said...

Today's society is full of all kinds of segregation and discrimination. Unfortunately segregation and discrimination are 2 things I think will be a part of society forever. People are discriminated because of all different kinds of things like religion, color and financial status.

I have personally been effected by alot discrimination. I am white and I have a black boyfriend and even my family has discriminate against us by saying things like "you should only date your race" and "you're wasting time dating someone of another race." I've had people tell me personally white women are too good for black men. I personally have no idea why or how people could say these things.

I have friends that have been segregated and pointed out just because of their race and been asked not to attend some events.

I don't feel like people should be judged or discriminated for anything let alone the color of their skin but it definately is nothing that will stop some people from being who they are.

tlawrence said...

Segregation may not always be obvious or plain in sight, but it is definitely there. It makes me think about lunch time in high school. Mostly all the black and spanish kids sat on one side of the lunchroom and most of the white kids on the other side. When I first noticed this I was a little shocked that I hadn't seen it before. In highscool I also noticed discrimination on the school bus alot towards a guy that openly gay. Alot of the other guys on the bus wouldn't sit next to him or talk to him. It was weird to see how someone was treated because of their sexual preference. Things like this just go by unnoticed, I guess we just gotta open our eyes a little wider.

tlawrence said...

Segregation may not always be obvious or plain in sight, but it is definitely there. It makes me think about lunch time in high school. Mostly all the black and spanish kids sat on one side of the lunchroom and most of the white kids on the other side. When I first noticed this I was a little shocked that I hadn't seen it before. In highscool I also noticed discrimination on the school bus alot towards a guy that openly gay. Alot of the other guys on the bus wouldn't sit next to him or talk to him. It was weird to see how someone was treated because of their sexual preference. Things like this just go by unnoticed, I guess we just gotta open our eyes a little wider.

Liz419 said...

Who has not been a witnes or discrimination or segregation? If someone hasnt they definately have a blind fold over their eyes. One good place to find this separation of people is in High School. You walk into the lunch room and there they are by tables. They Spanish table, the prep table, the goth table, the black table, etc. We do it to ourselves for some reason. I myself didnt even really like sitting at the spanish table (being spanish myself) just becuase it was almost like you had to prove how spanish you are and if you werent to the standard well you get the point. Now I am proud of my heritage and where I come from just the same as the next person but when I bought I little Puertorrican flag for my car I had so many cops tail gate me and then I finally decided to take it down and I did not get tailgated by a cop not once! That says enough all on its own.

figlio della lupa said...

A while back I read one essay for an English class I took regarding segregation. The author was a black man who had seen the country turn around from it's old ways.
He took a trip to a high school and was disheartened by so much segregation in the lunch room.
However, he came to the realization that people tend to group themselves with those that they can relate to. For example black students sat together because they grew up with the same hardships and similar family values,etc.

DLandon said...

I can not personally think of any types of segregation or discrimination that has affected me, however just as someone can be discriminated against for being black or Spanish, the same goes for someone who is white. My cousin applied for the Nursing Program two years ago at this very school and was denied. She then turned in a separate application, only this time she checked the box that said Spanish. This time she was approved. I do realize it is not as common, but it does happen. I also agree about the elderly. I work at a pharmacy; most of our patients are elderly, whom I know by name. And because I was raised by adopted grandmother who I happened to adore, I have a soft-spot for the elderly. It really upsets me when one of our patients come in and tell us how they are about to go live at a nursing home because their children think they are having too hard of a time living by themselves.

twin2 said...

I have experienced discrimination first hand. It happened when my family and I where traveling back north and had stopped in rural town in North Carolina to us the rest rooms. As my children and I where standing in line to use the women's room, I observed a young black boy waiting his turn to use the men's room. When it came to be his turn to go in, a white man PUSHED his way ahead of the little boy to go in. I then spoke up and said to the man. "sir, this little boy was ahead of you". The man gave me a sharp look and let the boy go in. I thought nothing more of it and finshed up with my own children. As we where heading out of the store back to our vehicle, the same white man came up behind me and said. "Girl, in this town you better know your place and keep your mouth shut"! You cam imagine how I felt. Between being frightened of this man and shocked that discrimination still existed like this. I had many emotions running through me. Anger, hatred and utter shock. It was a very sad sitiuation.

DaisyDown23 said...

I have seen discrimination against a lot of people. I work with a lot of older people with an old out look on life. One in particular is a woman in her seventies who seems to care about nothing else other than race. We were watching the news at our desk one day and it was explaining the importance of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. She went on to say the most ignorant and untrue things about him and the African American community. Things like "Whats the big deal about MLK and why do we have to celebrate it..? JFK was shot too and we dont have a day all about him. Why do we need to celebrate THEIR culture when we cant celebrate ours." I was shocked. I was blown away by her lack of knowledge concerning MLK. How could she NOT know that he changed the free world. I dont see black or white. I don't see the color of a face. Thats not what makes a person. My brother told my grandmother that he met this girl and the FIRST thing she asked was if she was black. I just can't even fathom being so enveloped in race. I hate seeing discrimination amont any sort. But racism is BY FAR my biggest discust.

max said...

I see discrimination today mostly at my job. It is mostly discrimination against young kids. Whenever anyone turns in an application and they are 16 they tend not to have a chance unless they knew someone. Also any young kid that is wearing baggy pants will be watch by our loss prevention because they think they are going to steal. I also see it at other places when I would walk in the store I would be followed by there LP and I would then say something to the fact they had other people to watch and they would walk away. There are also other groups that get discriminated against but know its more under the table and people say its another reason other then discrimination.

lil_princess86 said...

All over the world there is discrimination against race, etc. It seems like discrimination and racism will never go away. Now a days, people will discriminate against your color of your skin and where you live. I have experienced many times on how people speak about other races. For example my family and I are born and raised in the United States, but we are Puerto Rican and my own family discriminate against white people who live in trailers, and how they live. It really bothers me I never judge anyone on how they live. In conclusion people say that discrimination and segregation is over with but it is not.

BucFan1984 said...

There are definitely signs of both even though segregation is not as prominent as it used to be back in the day. When it comes to discrimination it is seen till this day just taking different approaches from religion to race. The closest I come to discrimination or segregation is when I spent 18 months in Iraq it was more the safety concern. It was just watching the Muslims around you and until you know otherwise you suspect the worst from everyone around. Looking back at it the is definitely discriminating but it was something that we had to take into account so we could make it back in one piece.

wmp8807 said...

Discrimination is ABSOLUTELY something that is still around, and it's happening 24 hours a day and 7 days a week. A few years ago, my family and I were in a store just talking, shopping, and doing our thing. We weren't worrying about anybody you know. We walked down this one aisle and there was this girl that was with her mom. All of a sudden and out of no where, the little girl started crying. Her mother asked her what was wrong and the girl replied by saying, "I don't like black people". My brother, my sister, and I couldn't even believe it. To hear something like that from a little girl who looked no older than 4 or 5 years old was a shocker! She obviously had to have heard that from someone else. It just really made me think. No matter how far people have said we've come from discrimination and racism, we are still there.

"Hey Man" said...

I think that a lot of people forget that blacks, gays, Hispanics, and the elderly are not the only groups that discriminate. I am white and I have been in many situations where it was the blacks that are doing the discriminating, in my opinion blacks are more focused on race than anyone else. If you don’t know what I mean then just drive through the inner city and watch how the black community looks at any white person. But if they don’t get anywhere in life it’s because the “white man” is holding them back, they don’t think that their own choices in life are the reason why they haven’t gotten anywhere. People need to take responsibility for their own actions, its not the “white mans” fault that they are still living in the inner city, it not our fault that they don’t take their schooling seriously, its not our fault that the teachers spend more time disciplining than teaching, it is their choice to be disruptive.

M.Gonzalez said...

I can’t say I have really had any major discrimination. The most I have really felt has been due to age, especially when I was young. I used to go into nice restaurants and was not treated well at all as if I could not pay. I did not worry too much about it, however it did in fact annoy me. What I basically did was brush it off, since I knew they were simply ignorant. It could be also seen as race I guess, but I think it really stemmed on the age factor. I have not had much problems with cops either, even though I was stopped one time on the NJ turnpike with my stepbrother who is African American, and it clearly appeared to be due to age (18), and most likely due to race. I just have never personally let it get to me. I work hard to get ahead, and do what I can to be respectful to others.

Qt said...

Discrimination is everywhere you go, whether it be race, age, or religion. I personally have not experienced discrimination first hand but I know it is around. So many people discriminate against people before they even get a chance to know them or meet them. I think the public school system is probably where the most discriminating goes on because there are Hispanics, Blacks, Whites, and many more ethnicities combined together in class rooms and anytime there is that many different people in a room, there is bound to be discrimination. I hope that I don’t ever have to experience discrimination at a personal level.

Athena Smith said...

Sorry to be answering late to your comments but I just came back.
Let me begin by suggesting that you watch this short video on NBC Conversation about race that evolves around the experiment of Dr. Kenneth Clark who gave a white doll and a black doll to black children and asked them which doll was the good one. The Clark experiment took place in the 40’s and he concluded that "prejudice, discrimination and segregation" caused black children to develop a sense of inferiority and self-hatred.” It was repeated in 2005 in a Harlem school with more or less similar results.
Please, if you decide to watch it, try to put aside whatever ideology you carry about races. See beyond it. See the history behind it. Because very seldom are our actions individual incidents in a vacuum. Instead, as the first chapter of your book indicated when it defined sociology, the so called individual actions to a large extent are shaped by societal forces.

Athena Smith said...

Jeremy
I believe you have left out many dimensions. As far as scholarships are concerned, in Florida, every graduate of the public high school system is eligible for 75% tuition waiver if they graduate with a B average or higher regardless of family income. Which is translated into this: We have plenty of rich kids (of all races) who have most of their tuition paid and still don’t graduate. USF graduation rates after 4 years is a mere 41% (all ethnicities). It jumps up to 54% after 6 years. After 10 years 59%. Retention rates therefore 60%. You will see at their site that the lowest rates are among Hispanics. I am referring to the 1996/07 column because it is the only one that has the ten year stats. Click on the white graduation rates. The four year graduation rates have been dropping. Despite tuition waivers, despite higher family income, despite safer neighborhoods.
What is their excuse?
Now click on the black graduation rates. They have remained the same.
Who is doing better?
You ask "How come they are not all in school despite scholarships?"
My answer is: How come aren’t all white kids in school despite tuition waivers and higher family incomes? And let us not forget that the most important determinant of a kid going to college, remains family income. Not scholarships. Because the family income will predetermine and will shape all sorts of personal characteristics and attributes.

Athena Smith said...

To all
I already posted a lengthy comment that touched upon the multiple causes of the higher levels of poverty among Blacks. Kmabe says that we are not responsible for slavery and she is absolutely right. However no one is blaming slavery itself. They blame the legacy of slavery and segregation. Lower levels of graduation can not be traced to a single cause. Various academic disciplines have already identified multiple causes. Heyman points to the value of individual responsibility, but even the level of individual responsibility is shaped by society’s structure, opportunities, socialization, family setting, self esteem, parental supervision, quality of schools, family income, peer influence, religious affiliation, individual experiences and so on and so on.

Athena Smith said...

Twin2
I have heard similar stories from this part of the country. However, trust me, it can be worse in Europe. A few years ago I witnessed on a Brussels bus (or subway) a white man literally kicking out a black student. I mean literally, he pushed him out by kicking him. Nobody moved. The remnants of colonialism.

Figlio della lupa
I agree with the results of the study. We tend to hang out with those we feel most comfortable with. I tended to hang out with those who agreed with my political views... I know... I shouldn't be proud... but I have been improving! The benefits of maturity if you like.

Athena Smith said...

Most of you gave fascinating personal insights. Thank you for sharing your stories and opinions so honestly with the rest of us. This post has been very interesting. For me at least.

Athena Smith said...

One more thing. Some of you discussed reverse discrimination, or discrimination against whites. Of course this is happening too. When we say we have to fight racism, we mean ALL TYPES of racism and discrimination.

As for affirmative action, I have studied it, I have listened carefully to both sides and I have mixed feelings. However, the Washington Post has a collection of interesting reports on that policy. You may read it here

As we speak, there is a new type of affirmative action taking place. This time is gender-focused. Given that the students who drop out are mostly boys, we see a gender ratio distortion in many colleges. At HCC it is 55% women vs 45% men (great place to get a date guys!)
But in other colleges we see numbers like 60/40 or worse 70/30. Some of these colleges have started adopting affirmative action to help men. They turn down qualified female applicants in order to accept not-so-qualified male ones.

Petit Monde said...

I certainly agree with the majority saying that discrimination is part of our everyday lives. And what is sad about it is that often we do it without even thinking, like it is a natural thing. I am a 30 year old female Catholic who is from the Philippines. I have lived in 3 different states in this country since I was 17 and have observed and learned a lot about myself and others. When I first came to the U.S., I stayed with my mom in Washington, D.C. I went to a predominantly black high school. I felt so lost and alone during the first half of the year – it was terrible. Not a lot of kids talked to me and I was so puzzled because back home I was pretty popular in school. It did not dawned on me that maybe it was because I looked different or possibly because I have an accent or maybe they think that I am stupid. One time a kid asked me where Philippines was and if we wore shoes over there. I remember being incredibly upset that day for I was insulted and felt degraded. During the course of the year, I learned about black history and was made aware of the awful things that happened to them. I feel for them, I really do, but it occurred to me that black people do it too - discriminate. There were few Asians, Hispanics and white kids in school and they all practically hang out with each other. The people that I made friends with were from all sorts of ethnic background like China, Guatemala, India, Netherlands, and Spain. I learned from them some of the things that they don’t like about other cultures, religion, etc. When I moved to Ohio and lived in a white neighborhood, I once again noticed the presence of discrimination. I was dating a Puerto Rican one time and he always hated coming over to my side of the town. He said that he got pulled over twice already by white cops for no reason. Over here in Florida, I have heard for the first time the “N” word used in a regular conversation. I actually hear it a lot more than I want to. I also get more comments about religion; how some do not understand why Catholics do that kneeling thing during their long mass and that Catholics are preaching to convince people to join them even though they nearly are all hypocrites. It absolutely saddens me that it’s unfortunate how some of those remarks came from my own friends/coworkers.

We are all guilty of some type of discrimination. Sometimes we do so because we were raised with beliefs from our family that have been passed onto generations. I remember my grandparents telling me that Japanese are bad people because they raped and killed women and children as well as bombed my country during the World War II. I still sometimes find myself blurting “I don’t like Japanese People” and I hate myself for doing that for I know deep inside that I do not mean it and it is wrong – I should know better. Some of us are still upset about things that happened long time ago in which we are not part of. By no means that I am saying to forget about the past, but we cannot keep teaching our children to hate others just because our parent’s parent’s told them to. We will never eradicate racism and discrimination that way.

As I got older, I accepted the fact that there will always be something that people would criticize about you and your beliefs. When I hear offensive things, I tell myself to not get involved in a confrontation. I simply look at the person and say to myself “Just ignore them; they might be just talking out of ignorance”. I have faith that mankind was not born with an instinct to be hateful. What has worked for me also is to try to turn those negative things into positive. Although it may be hard at times, when you hear opinions of others and you do not agree with it, just ignore it and walk away. Learning to respect others more, I think can help tremendously against discrimination. Instead of just pointing out bad things, we should focus more on the good qualities of each other.

Aries said...

As I sit here and read others stories- its amazing how we continue to accept these kinds of discrimination. We study history to keep it from repeating. Why is it that in 2008, after so much blood has been sacrificed we stand no where close to equality. I face discrimination in my job everyday. I am a claim adjuster and appraising vehicle is one of my specialty. When I walk into body shops, tow yards, and mechanic shop, I get the 15 minute interview on my qualification to do my job- their facial expressions is priceless when they see my nails. When they seem me ripping cars apart- they run like dogs, starring with amaze- a female as an estimator, using a crawl bar, and getting dirty. My fellow gender and myself have worked so hard to get educated and rise beyond this world expectation to earn our position, power, and respect.

I have a special needs son. He draws great attention out in public. He has experienced so much segregation from normal children. The sad part is that the parents of the normal children are the ones that relocate and redirect their children. The corruption of that one behavior causes a life time of damage.

In order for this world to change- we must look at the world through the eyes of a child

googleit@yahoo said...

Segregation and discrimination are here to stay but I feel it has gotten a little better over time. I personally have witnessed discrimination at my job and it was by my store manager. He would turn down job applicants based solely on their looks weather it be they looked like a druggie or
crook. He would then hire attractive young girls without any hesitation. 63 I also hear a lot of my co-workers making judgments about customers based solely on their looks. I know that this happens often and not just in the work place so you would have to be blind to say it doesn't exist in
America.

Mafaye said...

I agree with mostly all the comments I have read on here. Racism and Segregation is something of course that everyone wants to see disappear, as do I. However, I dont believe that we can totally get rid of segregation and racism when we still have things such a afirmitive action. Everybody wants to be equal, but are we even equal if minorities have a better chance of getting into a school over someone who isnt a minority? It all seems completly unfair to me and I think should stop. Everyone will not be equal until we start giving everyone eqaul opportunities. A few years ago my brother attended a University in Connecticut and was very involved with the school, so much to the point that he ended up living in Connecticut for good. After graduation he applied for a job in Administration and was told that the would qualify best for the job considering he knew everything and anything about the school. Unfortunatly he did not get the job because he was later told that the job was given to an african american woman who did not even attend the school. Stuff like that honestly makes me sick sometimes, and it all needs to stop becuase until it does nobody will be considered equal and segregation will exist for as long as it can.

sk8rgrl said...

Segregation and discrimination are all around us. Society discriminates on everything and everyone. We all do a little ourselves especially if we don't know the person. I once worked for this company and I was the only female. It was a little awkward, I will admit. There were a lot of remarks made about women and what there duty is. Needless to say one day I had enough, I packed up my desk quietly went to lunch made a phone call to my employer and never went back. That was the worst job I ever had. Discrimination is everywhere its like a disease that spreads from person to person. I do hope that society will change in hopes of a more positive outlook towards the human race.

btex said...

There is not much segregation anymore, but there is still plenty of discrimination not just on race but also we discriminate people for the clothes they wear or the area they live in. You see it alot in highschools kids dont like each other or pick on other kids for the small things. I did it myself when I was younger I didnt like some kids cause they dressed different I never understood the whole goth style and made fun even picked on them for their choice in clothing. Their is still plenty of discrimination in the world but now we discriminate based not just on race but religion, how much money people make, lifestyle, jobs.

gjones17 said...

Obviously, it has already been said that discrimination and segregation will always occur in this world. Everyday people are discriminated against, whether it be for the color of their skin, for the clothes they wear, their choice of religion, their age, their sexuality, the way they talk, etc. It doesn't take long to look at a person and start judging them by what you may see. Most people are discriminated against be people they do not know. I've caught myself judging the way someone looks, and thinking I would never be friends with someone like that, and then I end up being close friends with them once I've got to know them. You can't always judge a book by it's cover.

COWABUNGAAAA!!! said...

Discrimination is extremely evident in the United States.
(Let my just quickly say if you haven't seen Crash, go see it now)
Just about every single person can recall a moment where they've been discriminated against at least once. Whether you're black, white, Christian, gay, straight or fat, no one’s safe.
We say there's no more segregation in the U.S., but in reality all that's happened is that people find ways around the rules so that they get what they want without getting called out on it.
For example, last fall my friends and I went apartment shopping. A 19yr old Puerto Rican, 18 and 20 yr old lesbian couple and a 20 yr old guy with kind of crazy hair. We found our dream place in a nice area, gated community. We were set with applications and fees and one of our parents were ready to co-sign (with very very good credit). A couple of days later we got a sketchy call telling us that we could have the place. Oh by the way we would have to pay DOUBLE the security deposit. This made it almost $3,000.
Why?
My theory is that they know they can't just tell us no because they have no real reason except that we're young. So they'll just make it almost impossible for us to move in by raising the security deposit so high.
I can't say that I've never discriminated against anyone before either. Once you're in the job world, you experience it firsthand. You start to see yourself turn into what you used to hate so much as a 16 year old.
Working at a mall job and you look up and see a group of teenagers in baggy black chain pants and dyed black hair. Automatically, an alarm goes off in your head and you find yourself looking a little closer at their actions waiting for that moment where they shove something in their pocket and you've got them.
Someone I never wanted to be.
Once you get a tip job, everyone customer you have isn't a real person. They're lobbed into different piles of wealth and generosity. Then, based on the 5 second first impression a customer had on that employee is how much effort the employee will use to satisfy that customer.
These piles aren't just black and white either.
It's more specific like
"Christian women in their late 30's never tip well."

Unfortunately, there will never be the day where billions of people will realize that it's not the age, sex, or color of our skin that makes us hate someone. It's their personality as a whole that makes them suck so much.

Jenna said...

As evolved and advanced as the United States claims to be, discrimination can be seen in almost every facet of society, whether it be based on ethnicity, economic status, religious beliefs, sexual preference, or anything else people have prejudices about. At one of my previous jobs I saw discrimination. If a white young man or woman came in for a job application, my boss would gladly go pull out an application and chat with them for several minutes about potentially hiring them. If someone who was black came in for a job application, suddenly my boss' reply was "We aren't hiring."
I also have a problem with the way both the public and media respond to Senator Obama's religious beliefs. His family declares he's not Muslim, "that's not who he is", his supporters also defend his Christianity, adamantly stating he is not Muslim, that it is a "rumor". I was so relieved when I heard a reporter state "So what if he were?". Exactly. Why should it matter whether he's Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, or any other religion? Sadly, I think some people in this country believe Muslim=terrorist. There is always going to be discrimination as long as there are ignorant, uneducated people.

kirsten austin said...

Living in Brandon and Tampa all my life, the closest thing to segregation I ever observed was at Thanksgiving dinner, 5 years old, having to sit away from the grownups at a tiny plastic table with the other children. I definitely wouldn't say that counts. Discrimination however is something I witness everyday. Age, race, disabilities... Work, school... The hardest place to see it, in my perspective, is when discriminatory acts are performed by your own family against your morals. Very young I became connected to a family who accepted me as a... daughter, you could say. The men in that family had some of the fowlest mouths, and were NOT afraid to voice their opinion about any person of race or sexuality other than their own, and were very direct in their abuse... This was very hard for me at the time especially; seeing how they treated homosexuals forced me to hide my own sexuality for years, until the family moved away after the divorce. Before my immediate family and theirs became connected and until this day, my father always taught me to be understanding and accepting of others, and I have never failed him in that, and understood from a very young age what it was like to have someone discriminate me. However when I spoke against those men and attempted to voice any peaceful view, any anger they felt was turned to a 9 year old me. But hell, though some of the things they did were bad, I've seen and gone through a lot worse. It's a shame how common discrimination is here... But more of a shame that compared to other countries, we've got it good.

frankthetank said...

I have witnessed many types of discrimination since I was young. The worst I probably seen was in school. I think kids our the worst just because they don't know any better or maybe they hear stuff at home and don't hide it as well as there parents. As I got older I heard stuff at the work place like racist comments or jokes, and so on. Working in a resteraunt I witnessed a lot of discrimination, like when the servers would seat somebody they already had there mind made up soon as the table sat down what type of tip they were going to get based on what color the customer was. Even as a white male, I feel like I am discriminated against. I have been trying really hard to get some kind of scholarship for the last year and I do not qualify for any. But I constantly see ones for minorities. What I am getting at is that there should not be special things such as scholarships, TV stations, affirmative action, or any sort of grouping to help minorities because it keeps segregation around and in the end makes things worst.

Steelers88 said...

Well all see someone discriminating almost every day. People generally discriminate without even realizing it. For example, “Hello, and welcome to the Quickie Mart.” Is a classic line from the Simpsons cartoon that can discriminate against Middle-Eastern’s all working at gas stations. Our society today is full of discrimination. What I like about it though, is that now-a-days most people can laugh at it and not take it to serious. However, you will always have that one person that wants to sue everyone for discriminating them. There was another example that an elderly woman noticed a bunch of children playing around on her tree in the front of her yard, she yelled to the children to get off the tree and quit acting like a bunch of monkeys; well, all the children were African American. They went and told their mom and now she is suing.

hurricanes520 said...

I think that discrimination is a big part of our society. Everywhere you look you can see some kind of discrimination. If it is in school with kids that are overweight they, are not usually parts of the “in crowd”. In other parts of society people that are homosexual are usually discriminated against for their sexual orientation. As we see in almost every state gay marriage is not allowed, why is that? Is it because if they had a child that child would have two moms or dads or are they being discriminated against by society. Also people with disabilities are discriminated against not just those in wheelchairs but someone who might have a incurable disease. Society sees them as being dirty and unhealthy to be around but you can’t get HIV from shaking someone’s hand. Society is full of discrimination so we need to change and become one and live in harmony.

EUrban said...

I believe that segregation and discrimination is becoming a very common problem in our society as well as world wide. I can remember this sort of discrimination starting when I was in 1st grade. Each class used to line in a single filed line while walking down the hallways. I remember kids in my class making fun of a kid who had braces on his legs. I told them that it was not nice to make fun of people. We are taught this at a young age that this is not right, yet I feel that we learn by example. Discrimination is becoming so common it is scary to think what our children are going to think and say.

sweetklo020 said...

Discrimination has been around for a VERY long time. I believe discrimination will never go away. People discriminate against anything and everything. Religion, race, people with disabilities, sexual orientation, wealth, and cultures are many of the subjects that are being discriminated daily. I knew an awesome guy in high school who had Down syndrome. It was really sad because he was made fun of every day for his disability. He was a normal human being and so sweet. People would ask me, “Why do you talk to him?” I would tell them he is a great person and they didn’t get it. They would always laugh at him and couldn’t figure out why I didn’t laugh. I let them know they are fortunate to live the life they live and it isn’t like he chose to have Down syndrome.

Live Your Life said...

discrimination has been around from the beginning of time. I do not think it necessarily a bad thing. Its all just peoples perception. If a person noticed a particular behavior that is undesirable that a particular group of people tend to exhibit, then of course that first person isn't going to like them. Its ok to not be friends with someone because of personality differences, well then why is it not ok to not like a group of people for the same reason. Every culture has their own norms and values, and lots of cultures contradict another culture so, of course those two group aren't going to like each other. Also your likes and dislikes help you to connect with other people in the world. Friends become friends because they have common values. Who are we to tell someone they have to get along someone else?

idreamofcali said...

i feel that discrimination was a huge problem a long time a go in society but it still present in todays society as well. i know people very close to me who are racist and i know that their minds will never sway from how they feel now. i think that their is still a lot of sexist discrimination against women today, as far at jobs go, men obviously make more money nationwide. men can also be generally disrespectful towards women. however, i don't really think that too many people discriminate towards the disabled, as well as age.

Silly puddy said...

I would like to say that I did see some lines that contained segregation and/or discrimination. I have seen my own versions of segregation when I was in the military but you see and the ones that do it won’t agree it is happening. I remember when everyone in our workplace that has been around in the military for a very long time would get an outstanding on their performance report but the new individuals whom work hard year out would just get one below, excellent rating. This would prevent an individual to become promoted just because he or she has not been in the military six years or more. When your supervisor would find out how you did on your test, they always would have a smart remark like, “Maybe if you would have had an outstanding rating, you could have been promoted”.

Silly puddy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
RoxyChic0529 said...

As many people have said, segregation has been around forever and is most likely inevitable. It's sad really. I see segregation and discrimination everyday in most any place i go. If someone looks different than most, likes something that a majority doesnt like, or is a different color, there is almost always someone who will discriminate against those people. we shouldnt think any less of someone who is black or white or hispanic or asian or old or young or disabled. We are all different but we are still all people. We werent all supposed to be the same. Ive never really understood or agreed with the fact that men make more money than women simply because they are men. (no offense guys.) That is one issue that has always bothered me. I cant sit here and say that i have never made a racist remark or thought less of someone because they are different than i am, we all have done it. I will say i have learned that it can be hurtful and shouldnt be done and it seems to me the world would be a safer, better place if it had less segregation and discrimination.

jessica figueroa said...

I believed that everyone in this planet has said or even thought about somebody by discriminating them one way or another.It could be something not serious at all or something serious. Maybe people dont realize how much it affects somebody.Nobody is better than enybody else. I also believe that some people discriminate because they dont feel secure about themslves. There is always going to be discrimination everywhere for any reason. Personally, i've seen and experience discrimination. Everybody knows that their are many reasons in everyday life that people use to discriminate. There are thing you see at school, at work, or even in places like the mall or thearer. Many people judge a book by its cover, and dont bother to look inside.

catlvr42 said...

I personally have not been discriminated against to the level that some others have, but I do observe a lot in our society and frequently. With events like 9/11 and the college shootings you can almost hear a surge of judgement. Unfortunatly it doesn't seem to me things are getting much better. As long as there are people who look different,come from different backgrounds and different upbringings, there are going to be people who prejudge. It's just so surprising to me that for these same reasons, in this day and age, that there isn't less discimination.

gator_girl26 said...

Segregation is unfortunately inevitable and it has been around for such a long time. You are going to find it anywhere you go in our world today. People discriminate each and every day whether it be for a person's skin color, religion, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender or even age. All of us have in one way or another discriminated against another person, it's human nature, not that it isn't wrong, but no one is perfect. I think it is an awful thing but I don't believe we will get rid of it anytime soon.

Rashera88 said...

I have heard that some schools are segregated still and I don't mean blacks in one school and whites in another. I mean that they are in the same school but they hang out more of their skin than the other. I know in my school it wasn't like that at all which I was thankful because I like seeing everybody getting along with each other. I never seen any problems with segregation, race, or enthicity but I have heard stories from others. I heard from my friend that this white kid wrote something very unproperate on this black guys locker and when the black guy found out who done it started a big huge fight. I forgot what happened after that for it was a very long time ago and you can tell for I forgot the names. I feel bad for using white and black to describe people because I think everybody as one color. I have many friends' from different backgrounds and I never seen them have a go against each other. They respect each other as well as I do. I love my friends' and they love me. For the liking of others comes from the inside not from the outside at least that was what I was taught. I believe that people should look at each other as if we are all at the same level and not think of a race that is higher or lower than each other.

Athena Smith said...

Roxychick
You are right. All of us have done it, including myself. But the important thing is that we could learn from it.Improve, change, and move forward.

MyHead88 said...

Discrimination is a problem that will affect humanity for as long as humans walk this earth. It has been around for centuries, simply because some people cannot except change. It only takes one to ruin a whole group. In this country people have been instilled a certain rule of life. For someone to classify a group of people as Minority’s, this is discrimination, What makes this group minor to any one else? Is there anything biologically wrong with this Spanish or Asian person in which he or she is not an equal? No, we are all one species, and we all have the same components. It is just power and wealth that corrupt the minds of all, the levels of class are the contributors, the ancient way of life that people of wealth refuse to give away their money and the poor are willing to sacrifice everything to get it. And so racism and hate is formed as a barrier to protect those who sit high up on the mountain tops.

tquintero728 said...

I do observe discrimination on a daily basis. People discriminating because of gender, race, and even age. I have observed people discriminating because of age most often. About a month ago, I was waiting in line to buy a soda at a gas station. There was an elderly African-American man at the front of the line. He was purchasing lotto tickets, and was taking his time in doing so. He was asking the service clerk many questions about the prices, and she was becoming impatient. She began rolling her eyes, shaking her head, and speaking rudely to him. I understand that people have places to go, and would like for this man to hurry up, but that was the last thing on my mind. I felt sorry for this man. This clerk was treating him with absolutely no respect. I think we all need to treat the elderly with more respect.

1004 said...

Segregation and discrimination is an issue that has been present for many, many years. It is very hard to believe that segregation and discrimination is still present today. These issues are happeneing no matter where people go. It will always be present in any public place; especially in schools and jobs. I know that today, many students are segregated, according to their race, religion and many more. I have been discriminated because I was asian and so have my other asian friends. They started spreading rumors about us and were telling lies about asians. Discrimination and segregation is an issue that is never going to end because of the society itself and the people within it.

chiquita5 said...

There are different types of segregation and discrimination types in our modern way of life. America's original sin is alive and well even today years later after thoughts of it being diminished. In todays society I have noticed what i like to call modern segregation. Where different ethnic groups tend to segregate themselves to their own and not share a way of life with others that live or act a certain way other than their own. For example as hispanics my people tend to shy away from other type of ethnics groups for fear of the unknown or just because some pre conceived idea they've develope growing up. In any case we must realize first and foremost that we are all human beings and we are all created equal under one devine God. Then and only then will we be able to over come ''americas original sin'' that has plague us for centuries.

sunshine said...

I think that segregation is not as serious or open like it once was and if it is still happening I personally haven't noticed it. On the other hand, I have seen, herd and felt discrimination more often than I can remember to count. In my high school I would often here a lot of remarks and comments that were directly to my race. That was probably just because of our age at the time, that the students are more out spoken. At my jobs I only felt discriminated when I started to work at a more competitive place. I have worked at low end jobs and never had a problem, but when I started to work for a bank it was a hole new ball game. I had to consistently watch who was in the room and watch my language. Until one day I just got fired for speaking Spanish to another co-worker. I was humiliated, mistreated, and emotionally hurt. When I went to the human resources to talk about the incident I was told it was going to be looked at and reviewed. In a matter of one day They came back and fired us both with out any warning or investigation. I was astonished at how everything just happen so fast. It left me with a biter taste in my mouth. Like every other time I got over it and moved on. There is nothing I can do to stop it so I try not to let it get the best of me.

RockyRikoko said...

The only time I really felt discriminated against was in a market in Korea. Some buddies of mine and I were browsing the oddities being sold and found some crazy looking fish that we had never seen before being sold they were alive and a guy down the hall from us had a fish tank we could put them in. Well the “ahjimah” that was selling the fish out right refused to sell us anything because we were American. She got loud and began shouting. At that point a bunch of Korean guys showed up yelling angrily. Since that part of town was know to have a lot of mob dealings we didn’t think it was wise to stick around any longer. We left the market, without our fish, and went to a bar that was safe for Americans.

AlyssaBeene said...

I see discrimination every day as part of life that no one even stops to think about, and the funny part is that because it is so common you do not realize it happens until you stop and really look at what is going on around you. At my job, my boss only wants to hire Latino workers who do not speak a lot of English to work in the back of the store because he thinks that they will work harder and not spend time talking to the other employees who do speak English. This not only discriminates against the Latinos but also against the white kids that fluently speak English but could potentially do the job just as efficiently.

Tara Johnson said...

I have been discriminated against a lot in my life because of my hair color. I am used to people thinking that all blondes are dumb, airheaded, and ditzy. I just laugh and smile when someone wants to tell a blonde joke or looks at me like I am an idiot because I love proving them wrong. I know there are a lot of blondes with their head up in the clouds 24/7 but not all of them, so next time you look at a blonde and automatically think she is an idiot think twice before making a comment. There was one incident at my job where I felt very discriminated. I work at a law firm and have been for almost 2 and half years every client that I meet with or every deposition I attended. The client always has to make a comment like “your dad must be an attorney” or “how did you get this job”. Like I am not capable of getting this position on my own which I did. They think just because I am a young teenage and I am blonde that I am not skilled enough to receive an accomplished job.

TTZ3806 said...

There is no doubt that there is discrimination throughout the world. I haven't experienced much discrimination throughout my life, but I understand the seriousness of it.It is crazy to see how cruel people are to others just because of their race, sexual orientation, etc. Unfortunately, discrimination will be around forever. I don't know how there could ever be a solution to ending discrimination. It will happen no matter what, whether we like it or not. Most of my friends are at least a year or two older than me, and I do feel like people treat me differently because I am, and look much younger. The fact is, I find myself much more mature than my friends who are older than I am. Obviously this isnt the largest case of discrimination, but I still can't stand it. I couldn't even imagine what others must go through.

pcgirl said...

I believe that in today’s society there is segregation and discrimination everywhere. It is not always seen but behind closed doors it is there. Personally I have not really seen or heard of any thing other than job discrimination. I know of a few people who own businesses that will only hire white people. They will not even look at your application for consideration once they realize your skin tone. It is very wrong and immoral to judge people like that. Some people are so ignorant that they will not hire a high-qualified person simply because of their skin color and/or gender. They will go with a low qualifying person just because that person fits their ideal image for an employee. I really wish people would get it through their thick heads that looks are not everything.

Goob07 said...

In my opinion most of the discrimination that former generations have dealt with is ending...Young people today rarely ever see the color of someone's skin as a reason to think differently of them. I work in retail, and I do see a backward kind of discrimination all the time. The other day there was an black woman shopping,and I asked if I could be of any assistance. She said no, and I told her I would be around if she needed anything. When I walked away I went over to stand with one of my co-workers who happened to be black also. Not even five minutes later the same woman came up to the two of us, and as if I was not even there asked my co-worker if she would come and help her...I was a little more than shocked. I'm sure that is tame compared to some of the discrimination in this world, but it really caught me off gaurd.

foXyE77 said...

Discrimination is a big part in our society.It can be seen everywhere. The best example I can give is when i was in high school.Yes, there was cliques but not just jocks,nerds,preppy,etc.But almost a separation in races.As I remember walking into lunchroom my freshmen year of high school i remember looking for my friends to sit with but as I looked i saw tables with all black,then another with all white,and then another with all hispanics and so on.I remember thinking where should I sit...The ironic part is that like myself as a freshmen I didnt know many people and I saw a white friend of mine sit with white strangers and so on as i remember seeing the pattern of a few familiar faces sitting with strangers of their race.Excited that I caught my white friends eye I ended up sitting with her even thought im hispanic because I obviously would rather sit with someone I knew then a table of strangers.Like in all schools as the weeks went by everybody made friends and the ethnity tables turned into groups of friend tables.But the thought still crosses my mind of that first day when the tables were all around tables of race.

Britt said...

I feel that segregation and discrimination are a big part of our society today. Like others have mentioned, when we see a person who looks Arab or is wearing a turban, we seem to automatically think he/she is a terrorist. It is not fair the way people are judged. Everywhere we go, no matter how perfect we see ourselves, we are always segregating and discriminating people that we may or may not know. If we are out and we see little kids running around and misbehaving we assume they come from bad parents. Another action of segregation that I’ve seen in my family is when my parents met my boyfriend. They thought because he had tattoos that he was a trouble maker and wasn’t a decent guy. I don’t think in our lives we will ever see the world without segregation or discrimination.

JR8 said...

Discrimination is all over the world and to be honest with you it will never stop. There are so many different thing you can discriminate on yeah there are the big things like race and religion and ethnicity but there are all kinds of things that people discriminate on. For instance when I was growing up in elementary school there where kids that would get made fun of because they where fat and there was the kids that were not athletic and were called geeks and nerds and then there were the ugly girls that got there fair share of discrimination. So there is discrimination everywhere and there is no way to stop it and that’s just terrible.

vulcan925 said...

On the surface I really don't see any open or if you will blatant segregation in the mainstream. Under the surface I do believe there is an underlying segregational message. Have a look at the media, there are always hidden messages of segregating homosexuals from straight people, or weeding out "potential terrorists" who are all Arabs or Arab-looking. I am an Indian, a rather tall one, and half the time I never smile, so yes when I go to airports or even pizza parlours I am treated with fear. If you really want to see segregation on the level of age, gender, race, etc. just turn your TV on. The media is the worst perpetrator of such segregation.